There’s not doubt about it, Texas summers can be scorchers. But don’t worry, there are plenty of places to cool off. From spring fed swimming pools to actual swimming holes, here’s your guide to beating the heat in Texas.

8 Sublime Swimming Holes in Texas

1. Balmorhea State Park – Balmorhea, TX

Right around the corner from the Balmorhea State Park is the world’s largest spring fed pool. You heard that right, the largest in the world! Because the water comes from underground springs, it’s 72 degrees year around. Swim, scuba or even bird watch if you’re not too keen on the water. The pool is known to house turtles, fish, and other creatures. Admission is $7 for adults and free for children 12 and under. There are also 34 campsites if you want to stay overnight.

9207 TX-17, Toyahvale, TX 79786


2. Jacob’s Well – Wimberley, TX

This swimming hole in Wimberley luckily hasn’t gone mainstream yet. On any given day you’ll find only 20-30 people. The well is about 12 feet wide, and it descends 35 feet, before descending another 120 feet at an angle in to caves. Diving in the caves isn't recommended even for scuba divers, but risk takers can take a big jump into the well from the nearby rocks. Admission is $9 for adults, $5 for children 5-12 and free for children under 4.

1699 Mount Sharp Road, Wimberley, Texas 78676


3. Hamilton Pool – Dripping Springs, TX

This pool is a must see because I’m sure it’s like nothing you’ve ever seen before. Hamilton Creek spills over a 50 foot waterfall forming a pool below. Be sure to check ahead, because the pool is sometimes closed due to weather. They also limit the number of visitors at a time because it’s located in a small canyon. Be sure to catch one of the guided tours if you have time! Park entrance is $10 per vehicle.

24300 Hamilton Pool Rd., Dripping Springs, TX 78620


4. Krause Springs – Spicewood, TX

Founded in 1955, this swimming hole is located about 30 miles west of Austin. The 115 acre property is entirely owned by the Krause family and has 32 springs. Campsites are available as well as RV sites with water and electricity available. Admission is $7 for adults, $5 for children 4-11 and free for children under 4.

404 Krause Spring Rd, Spicewood, TX 78669


5. Barton Springs – Austin, TX

This spring located in Zilker park is said to have healing powers. The pool itself is nearly 3 acres and water temperatures average between 68-70 degrees. If that don’ts help you beat the heat, I don’t know what will! While you’re there, be sure to look out for the endangered Barton Springs Salamander. The spring is a federally protected habitat. Admission is $8 for adults, $4 for children 12-17, $3 for children 1-11 and free for children under 1.

2201 Barton Springs Rd., Austin, TX 78704


6. Devil’s Waterhole – Near Burnet, TX

With its sparkling blue water, colorful rock outcrops, and striking sunsets, this gem of the Hill Country is just an hour northwest of Austin. You’ll never get bored here. On the water, you can swim, boat, water ski, scuba dive and fish. On land, you can camp, backpack, hike and geocache. Geocaching is a modern-day treasure hunt. People hide geocaches everywhere, from just down the street to the most remote wilderness areas. Admission is $6 for adults and free for children 12 and under.

3630 Park Road 4 West, Burnet, TX 78611


7. Blanco State Park – Blanco, TX

Also near Austin, Blanco State Park is 104.6 acres located along the Blanco River in Blanco County. The beautiful pool was created by damming the spring that made this site popular amongst early explorers and settlers. Like many of the other swimming holes here, activities include camping, swimming, picnicking, hiking, nature study, boating, fishing, and my favorite, tubing. The most wallet-friendly on the list, admission is $4 for adults and free for children 12 and under.

101 Park Road 23 , Blanco, TX 78606


8. City Tube Chute – New Braunfels, TX

Last, but certainly not least on the list is City Tube Chute, a water slide carved into the side of the City’s dam on the Comal River. It diverts tubers around the dam as they float the river and is the longest slide of it’s kind in the world. For those of you unfamiliar with the term, tubing is a popular summer event where you ride down the river in an inner tube, often with a cooler of beer. Admission is $5 and you can rent a tube without a bottom for $7 or one with a bottom for $9.

100 Liebscher Drive, New Braunfels, TX 78130


This article was written by Lauren Gaw.