Beaches in Wyoming? You bet! In the Cowboy State, you can find swimming, boating, fishing, and more, and Yellowstone National Park is just the tip of the iceberg. With around 100 lakes, reservoirs, and rivers throughout the state, Wyoming has some amazing beaches. One is so exceptional, it’s often listed among the most unique in the world. So, pack your swimsuit, book your Wyoming vacation rental, and most importantly, have fun!

1. Leigh Lake

mountain reflection

There are several lakes in Grand Teton National Park that are better known than Leigh Lake, but this one is definitely one of the most breathtaking in the state, and one of the most unique in the world. Formed when a glacier cut through the land and melted thousands of years ago, Leigh Lake is nearly 2 1/2 miles wide and nearly 3 miles long. It has stunning teal water and is surrounded by pine trees that grow close to the pebbled beach and lake shoreline. With crystal clear water and the majestic mountains in the background, you’ll feel like you’re in a whole different world.

2. Glendo State Park

night scene
Source: Flickr / Greg Mazu

Coming in at second on our list is Glendo State Park. With over 2 miles of tree-lined sandy beaches, there’s plenty of opportunities to camp right next to the water! As one of most popular boating parks. Glendo State Park also offers water-skiing, fishing, and other water- based activities. In fact, the fishing is so good that Glendo has several fish records!

3. Fremont Lake

deep blue water
Source: Flickr / schwa021

Fremont Lake, located just north of Pinedale in the Bridger-Teton National Forest, is the state’s second largest natural lake and includes the Sandy Beach Picnic Area on the southeastern shore. There’s a swimming beach, sailing, canoeing, and lots more opportunities for water fun. Just keep in mind that this beauty is famous for its cold waters!

4. Greys River

mountain peak

The Greys River area is a favorite among locals thanks to its great trout fishing, kayaking, rafting and canoeing. Now you’re in on the secret too! The Greys River is a tributary of the Snake River, flowing through western Wyoming. Surrounded by the towering Salt River Range to the west and the matching Wyoming Range to the east, each with several peaks that reach above 11,000 feet in elevation, the scenery is incomparable. The surrounding mountains are also great for horseback riding, hiking, and hunting.

5. Gros Ventre River

peaceful water
Source: Flickr / Dave Bezaire

The Gros Ventre River, pronounced “grow vant,” is one of the most popular fly fishing destinations in the area thanks to its easy access. Most of the river doesn’t run along the road, so you get a more secluded feeling for your quiet fishing expedition. The river also provides nearly all types of water from pools to riffles to runs with some great places to take a dip.

6. Alcova Reservoir

lonely tree
Source: Flickr / Eric

Alcova Reservoir actually features four different beaches, Black Beach, Big Sandy Beach, Okie Beach and the Children’s Swim Beach, and since we couldn’t choose just one, we decided to include them all! There are also six campgrounds and eight boat docks.

7. Pacific Creek

pine trees near the creek
Source: Flickr / Bryant Olsen

Pacific Creek is another excellent fishing destination, offering some of the best access and solitude that can be found near Jackson Hole. The creek originates from North Two Ocean Creek, which splits into Pacific and Atlantic Creeks at Two Ocean Pass along the Continental Divide. Surrounding Teton National Park also has three moderate hiking trails in the Pacific Creek Area, providing you with options that are both challenging and scenic. Keep everyone in the family entertained while half of you bring in dinner while the other half explores the surrounding areas.

8. Salt River

flat-water river
Source: Flickr / Wayne Noffsinger

The Salt River is a flat-water river, but it offers awesome opportunities for scenic canoe, kayak, rafting and tubing floats. This river is 84 miles in all and is named for several exposed beds of salt and briny salt springs. It used to be a popular destination for Indians and later pioneers seeking salt and game. If you’re looking for fish, the Salt River is also home to Brown, Rainbow, Brook and Snake River Fine Spotted Cutthroat and Trout.

9. Snake River Canyon

tall pine trees
Source: Flickr / Larry Barnes LB9

The Snake River takes a large bend northwest through Snake River Canyon, cutting through the Snake River Range and into eastern Idaho. It’s known worldwide for it’s crystal clear waters, unique geology, numerous recreation adventures, and amazing varieties of wildlife. Come here to experience wild water, world-class fishing, great hiking, and memorable camping. If your back can’t handle sleeping on the ground, there are also great vacation rental options nearby. Experience sleeping under the stars in the comfort of a cozy bed!

10. South Park

magnificent landscape
Source: Flickr / Tim Lumley

With South Park’s boat ramps, you can easily access to the Upper Snake River. The area features a small craft and tube launch, restrooms and a new entrance off S. Highway 89. Bring your camera because the Upper Snake River contains incredibly diverse landscapes including high elevation sagebrush deserts, sand dunes, mountain peaks over 12,000 feet, dense pine, fir, and spruce forests, and many crystal clear streams and rivers.