New York City is a great walking city, but not all of the spaces are ideal for walking dogs. Here’s a roundup of the places that will welcome both you and your pet, from running courses to parks around town.

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Take Your Dog On A Walk In These 7 Beautiful NYC Spots



1. Tompkins Square Park Dog Run

Founded in 1990 as part of an effort to revive Tompkins Square Park, the dog run is considered by some to be the first dog run in New York City. The dog park underwent a whopping $450,000 in renovations, and features today include a state-of-the-art running surface, both a large and small dog run, picnic tables, swimming pools and bath areas for the pups. The 18,500-feet park is a dream of wide open spaces for man and his best friend.


2. Socrates Sculpture Park

Free and open to the public every day of the year, Socrates Sculpture Park is a 4.7-acre plot of land with over 90 varieties of trees and plant life. This waterfront landscape is an urban forest that offers plenty of walking tours, exhibitions and programs throughout the year. Dogs must be kept on a leash, but the park brings plenty of culture and art to the great outdoors that both humans and canines can enjoy.


3. Canine Court at Van Cortlandt Park

Pups who like to play will have a howling good time at Canine Court. This 15,000 square foot plot of land is a fenced-in area on Van Cortlandt Park’s Parade Ground. The Canine Court has two areas for dogs, a playground of sorts, where pups can access a variety of jumps, tunnels and other colorful equipment, as well as an open field where dogs can run around. Other parts of the park includes a freshwater lake, brook, forest, playgrounds and even a public golf course. Though dogs must be kept on a leash outside Canine Court, it’s definitely an adventure out there.


4. Brooklyn Bridge

Come at the wrong time, and Brooklyn Bridge might be flooded with tourists, joggers, and cyclists. But come during off peak hours, and you’ll have a nice stretch of walkway offering an incredible view. Visit at night, and you’ll find a majestically lit skyline reflecting off the East River. Come early morning, and you might catch the sun casting its first rays on the horizon. Brooklyn Bridge Park also has a dog run called Pier 6, which will open April 3, 2017 after renovations. Here, they’ll be able to run free off their leashes any time between 6 a.m. to 11 p.m..


5. Hillside Dog Park and Run

Hillside is a down-to-earth neighborhood spot in Brooklyn where dog walkers can come to let the dogs stretch their paws and let them off their leash. It’s a simple yet functional space where dog walkers can come if they don’t feel the need to share the park with sun bathers, joggers, picnickers and the like. On the other hand, there will most likely be other canines around, frolicking in the kiddie pool or running up and down the sloped park. The grounds are completely fenced in, with plenty of shade from trees and scattered wood chips, grass and dirt all around.


6. South Street Seaport

There’s lots to see at the seaport for both dog walkers and their dogs, whether walking along the historic waterfront or dining at one of the dog-friendly restaurants. Il Porto and Heartland Brewery and Beer Hall are two outdoor restaurants that allows pets. The Seastreak Ferry is also dog-friendly, as long as they’re kept on a leash. The neighborhood, also home to a maritime museum and numerous shops, is quite a treat, especially with the addition of the South Street Seaport Dog Park, where dogs can play off their leash.


7. Washington Square Park

Friendly dogs and owners flock to Washington Square Park, located in the heart of Greenwich Village. If socializing is on your dog’s calendar, Washington Square Park Dog Run is the it place to be. There are two dog runs, one for smaller dogs and another for larger dogs. Recent renovations a few years back have vastly improved the site, which has a water area with low fountains for the dogs and plenty of benches in the shade for the owners.



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This article was written by Hanna Choi.