5 Tips for Better Travel Photos

Nothing captures the essence of one’s travels like the photographs one takes. To make those travel photos even more special, we’ve rounded up 5 sets of tips for better travel photos.

1. How to Choose the Best Instagram Filter for Your Photo: this article featured in Mashable is a must-read for Instagram users. It presents 17 filters in a highly digestible format with a description of the techniques, effect and when to use it.

Here’s an example (hint: you can also choose the view as one page option)

2. How to Photograph People:  this Lonely Planet article includes tips on taking photos of people that range from taking portraits to photographing groups, travel companions, children and taking environmental portraits.

  • Tips on taking portraits: fill the photo’s frame with your subject. Be sure to always get a sharp image of their eyes, even if other features are out of focus.   You’ll want to avoid backgrounds that either have very light or very dark patches of color or are simply “too busy.”
  • Tips on photographing travel companions: break away from the routine of having your fellow travelers pose.  Instead photograph them while they’re interacting with local people – for example if they’re bartering at a market or completely absorbed by a work of art.  Your photos will capture the travel experience in a more genuine way.

3. Travel Photography Tips – Being “Lucky” :  how are some photographers consistently lucky in getting those amazing shots?  Popular writer and photographer behind the blog Mallory on Travel offers some tips.

"Catching the unexpected"

  • Experiment before departing for your trip. That way when it really “matters,” you can be ready to take that amazing shot.
  • Keep your curiosity. Round the next corner or wander down the next street; you’ll increase your likelihood of capturing that special picture.
  • Keep your camera at the ready.  Have the camera out of the bag, switched on and with the lense cap off.  Then don’t worry about setting the picture up perfectly; the importance is to catch those fleeting moments that make for incredible photographs.

4. Tips for Taking Photos in the Rain:  National Geographic contributing editor and recognized photojournalist Jim Richardson shares some tips perfect for the fast-approaching fall weather.

  • Watch for reflections.  The rain can often transform boring, everyday scenes into rich, reflected murals.
  • Shoot from inside a car.  This is especially effective if the wind is coming from the other side of the car, as you will have a better chance at staying dry while shooting with the window rolled down.
  • Buy an umbrella and include it in your picture. Often the clouds are bright and the scene below them is dark. In addition to shielding you and your camera from the rain, the umbrella can also cover up any too-bright clouds and make your scene look much better exposed.

5. General Travel Photography Tips:  top travel blogger & photographer Gary Arndt of the leading travel blog Everything Everywhere shares some general travel photography tips in this interview.

One really only needs 2 filters:  a neutral density filter and a circle polarizing filter.  Other types of filters, such as colored filters, can be simulated when the photos are processed.

  • Tripods are “the single best thing you can to do improve”  your photos.  This is especially key when one is capturing HDR images or taking photos in low light and really helpful when using a long zoom.  But basically a tripod helps even when snapping photos with a point and shoot camera.
  • Editing the photos is key – even if it’s just a small exposure adjustment or making sure the horizon is set horizontal.  You don’t absolutely need to use special photo editing software; even free online editing sites can make a huge difference.

Have any great tips to add?  Leave a comment!

 

 

 

 

 

 

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